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1 UNIVERSITY OF SUNDERLAND ASSESSMENT COVER SHEET / FEEDBACK FORM BA

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UNIVERSITY OF SUNDERLAND

ASSESSMENT COVER SHEET / FEEDBACK FORM
BA (HONS) BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

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Student ID: #179107533 Student Name: MPHEMBUZYO MKANDAWIRE
Module Code: SIM335 Module Name: MANAGING PROJECTS
Due Date: 13.04.2018 Centre / College: INTEL COLLEGE Hand in Date: 13.04.2018
Assessment Title: PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Learning Outcomes Assessed:

Learning
Outcomes
Assessed:
Feedback relating learning outcomes assessed and assessment criteria given
to students:

Mark:

Areas for Commendation:
Areas for Improvement:
General Comments:
Assessors Signature: Overall Mark (subject to ratification
by the assessment board)
Moderators Signature:
Students Signature: (you must sign this declaring that it is all your own work and all sources of information
have been referenced) M.C MKANDAW IRE

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Table of Contents
1.0 TASK 1 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 3
QUESTION 1 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
QUESTION 2 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3
QUESTION 3 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
QUESTION 4 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 4
QUESTION 5 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
QUESTION 6 ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5
2.0 TASK 2 …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
2.1 Introduction ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7
2.2 Description of the Project ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7
2.3 Project Leadership ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
2.4 THE PROJECT LIFE CYCLE ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11
2.4.1 Initiation phase ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 11
2.4.2 Planning Phase …………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12
2.4.2.1 Scope Statement ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12
2.4.2.2 Budgeting and Finance planning …………………………………………………………………………….. 12
2.4.2.3 Work breakdown Structure …………………………………………………………………………………… 13
2.4.2.4 Gantt chart ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 13
2.4.2.5 Risk management …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15
2.4.3 Performing/implementation phase ………………………………………………………………………………. 16
2.4.4 Termination phase or closing phase ……………………………………………………………………………… 17
2.4.5 Conclusion …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 18
3.0 References ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 19

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1.0 TASK 1
QUESTION 1
A project’s core principles according to (The Chartered Body for the Project Profession, 2018) a
project must be Mission Focused that delivers benefits, secondly it must have the Aspects of
Uniqueness, here each project needs to differ from every other in terms of the outcomes. Social
Construction as a project doesn’t behave like a machine but rather involves people and
organizations who work to meet the intended objectives. According to Rowe( 2015) a project is
Temporary in a way that it has a start and an ending with a defined time period. (Rowe, 2015)
.Another characteristic would be integrating which requires interlinking of activities, it requires
knowledge and resources to be brought together in a process, lastly Emergence and Uncertainty,
a project manager has to deal with uncertainty because detailed requirements may not be known
in advance. (Maylor, 2011)
QUESTION 2
The key steps in the scope statement process include; establishing the project Goal Criteria,
includes cost, schedule, performance and deliverable. Developing the project management. This
is essentially the project’s bureaucratic step that creates control systems to ensure that all team
members know their roles and responsibilities. Thirdly, establishing a Work breakdown
Structure divides the work into components parts to begin establishing critical interrelationships
among activities, (which steps must precede others, which steps are independent of previous
tasks). Lastly, creating a scope baseline is the final step in the process of systematically laying
out all pre-work information. (Pinto, 2013)

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QUESTION 3
GANTT CHART
Time (days)
Tasks 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
a
b
c
d
e
f
g
h

The critical path is A+C+F+H= 22Days.
Gantt chart benefits include:
It makes it clear that you cannot do anything at the same time. Therefore, it shows dependencies
between tasks, usually with something like a line connecting them. (Duffy, 2016) Gantt charts
help managers schedule and monitor specific activities. The chart helps alert managers when
activities are off track and deadlines are in danger of being missed. Lastly it also aims managers
with scheduling and resources. It helps teams understand the overall impact of project delays can
foster collaboration while encouraging better task organization. (Harmon ; Angela, 2016)
QUESTION 4
Contingency funding is the money set aside at the begin of a project if a need occurs, for
example to offset unforeseen circumstances such as increases in prices may lead to increase in
costs, therefore we include a contingency funding in project cost estimates to reduce the risk of

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overruns of the project objectives to a level acceptable to the organization. This plan also
identifies alternative strategies to be used to ensure the project success if specified risk events
occur. Sometimes a project might run out of resources, money, labour costs, th5erefore the
contingency funds help cover costs in all those activities in our project. (PMBOK Guide, 2018)
QUESTION 5
Risk assessment and management is a systematic process that deals with anticipating and
managing risk. It provides a broad set of tools, techniques and methodologies these enable risk
practitioners to deal with risk like properly. (Ezinne, 2013) According to the risk management
plan, this how we manage risks: risk avoidance, risk reduction and risk mitigation. In Risk
avoidance involves entirely not performing any activity that may carry risk. E.g hiring
contractors that have worked with us before. (Eckerd, 2014) Risk reduction, works as a loss
control where it involves the impact of the risk, for instance lack of experienced staff. In risk
transfer involves transferring risk to another party like insurance. (Burke, 2013)
QUESTION 6
Project quality management focuses in activities, quality policies, objectives and measurement
required to satisfy the needs of the project and ultimately the customer. (PMBOK Guide, 2018)
Project management consists of four main processes which are quality planning, quality
assurance, quality control and quality improvements. (Project Management for Development
Organisations., 2008) Quality planning involves the preparation of quality management plan that
describes the processes and metrics that will be use, the quality plan must be agreed upon by the
stakeholders to make sure that we meet their expectations. In Quality assurance Diaz ; Antonio(
2018) discovered that quality assurance systems assume that there are measurement metrics set

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of standards and best practices for continuous improvement of goods and services. Quality
control, this involves testing, inspection and measurement. The aim is to ensure the consistent
nature of product or process of interest, to reduce costs and losses inherent in the process and to
maximize client satisfaction. The quality check can either be qualitative or quantitative. (Richard
M.J, 2018). Lastly, quality improvements is the term used by organization to describe how
information provided by quality assurance and quality control processes are used to drive
improvements in efficiency and effectiveness. (The Chartered Body For The Project Profession,
2018)

Task 1 word count: 804

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2.0 TASK 2
2.1 Introduction
The Mason PLC project is a market driven project that involves the expansion of a new club
which will incorporate new facilities and services. The new club which is expected to be larger
than the existing clubs is due to the additions of a small 100 seat cinema and extensive beauty
spa. The beauty spa will have a vast range of treatments and services available including
hairdressing, massage and cosmetic treatment. This project of a new club is expected to be done
within a 60 weeks timeframe and has an investment of £2 million pounds.
2.2 Description of the Project
In this project report we are going set goals and objectives in order to do all the activities
successfully these objectives have to be SMART, meaning Specific, Measurable, Attainable,
Realistic and Time bound, as a project manager this project’s purpose and needs is that we are
expanding to market and trying to gain customers and meet their needs so leading the project
with good leadership skills will help finish this project on time and successful. And in relation to
the project life cycle we will allocate each stage of the project according to the timeframe and
budget and this project will also include monitoring and controlling problems that might possibly
take place during this 60 weeks.
2.3 Project Leadership
Leadership is the art of motivating a group of people to act towards achieving a common goal. It
is all about setting objectives, goals, generating enthusiasm and motivation. In this project, the
manager is the leader and has been appointed by Mason PLC to take charge, so in order to have a
successful project we need a good a leader with the right leadership style. (johann et al., 2014)

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there are three main types of leadership styles namely: autocratic, democratic and laissez faire
according to the Mason PLC the appropriate leadership style to adopt is the democratic
leadership style because when the employees take part in decision making its going to help both
the manager and the progress of the project. (HEAGNEY, 2012)
Autocratic style Democratic style Laissez- faire style
Decision-
making
Decisions are made by
leaders (centralized)
Employees participate in
the decision-making
process(decentralized)
Decisions are made by
the subordinates
(decentralized)
Authority Leaders retain the
authority for decision-
making
It is partly delegated to
subordinates
It is completely delegate
to subordinates
Motivation Negative motivation
(punishments)
Positive motivation
(rewards & incentives)
Self-motivated to work
Behaviour-
orientation
Task-oriented
behaviour
Relationship-oriented
behaviour
Relationship-oriented
behaviour
communication Vertical, one way top
to bottom
Vertical, two way, top to
bottom and vice versa
Vertical and horizontal
When
appropriate
When project is short
on time.
when subordinates are
unskilled,
inexperienced
When Employees are
considered part of the
system.
Leaders prefer sharing
decisions
when team is highly
motivated and is highly
skilled, who have done a
good job in the past.
Limitations Worker’s potential
remains unexploited
It costs the organisation
time and resources
Low accountability and
lack of role awareness

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Table 1 LEADERSHIP STYLES (Mind Tools, 2017)
Skills and Competences of a Project Manager
An experienced project manager knows how to lead the creation of an effective project strategy,
build an alright project plan, drive daily activities while problem solving along the way.
Therefore here are the main skills and competencies that could be imperative to the success of a
project manager:
Leadership skills
The project manager takes initiative, mentors team members, effects change and monitors
progress, drives scope development and management, develops and manages project budgets
skills time management to enable the project to according to the deadline, employs strong
organisation skills, integrates ongoing risk management trade-offs and incorporates time
management principles into the work flow. (packendorff et al., 2014)
Team management skills
The project manager motivates and inspire the team, leads by example, manages and resolve
conflict, build relationships within and outside the team, delegates appropriately, demonstrates
team organisation and governance, builds a culture bases on high performance, he explains what
should be done and he involves and empowers team members in a solution. (Benson, 2013)
Communication skills
The project manager conveys information to all key stakeholders in both written and verbal
formats, employs active listening, prepares and delivers presentations, infers meaningful insights
from communication channels. (Slovak journal and civil engineering, 2008)

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Orientation to targets and critical thinking
The project manager contributes to the strategy beyond his field of operation and he contributes
to the planning process, he achieves high objectives, and understands his own field of operation.
He determines the validity of project progress applies ongoing analysis to the project and
integrates the project with cross functional objectives.
THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LEADERS AND MANAGERS
According to Forbes (2016) Leadership is the process is the process of influencing others to
work (to the best of their capabilities) willingly towards a goal. While management is the process
of planning, organising, leading and controlling. According to the table below leaders and
managers are different. (Forbes, 2016)
LEADERS MANAGERS
? Creates a vision
? Take risks
? Coach
? Motivates
? Innovates
? Inspire
? Originate
? Long-term view
? Challenges the status quo
? Original

? Creates goals
? Control risks
? Plans
? Directs
? Administers
? Manages
? Initiate
? Short-term view
? Accepts the status quo
? Copy

Figure 1 DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LEADERS AND MANAGERS (Forbes, 2016)

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2.4 THE PROJECT LIFE CYCLE
This refers to the stages in a project’s development, they are important because they demonstrate
the logic that governs a project; they also help us develop our plans for carrying out the project.
(Pinto, 2016)
The Mason PLC project will have to undergo four phases from conceptualization to termination
phase. These stages are waypoints at which the project team can evaluate both its performance
and the project overall status.

(Source: Sketchbubble.com, 2017)
2.4.1 Initiation phase
A feasibility study is conducted for the Mason PLC project to examine whether each option
clearly identifies the project. How realistic is it to expect have sufficient or enough funds to
complete it. Throughout the project Mason PLC project the project manager must ensure that
goals and objectives are clearly stated and SMART (Field & Keller, 1998).This acronym means

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that the goals must be Specific, meaning to open a new Mason PLC club and expand
successfully with the new facilities making sure it keeps its original operations and structure to
attract and meet needs of our customers. Measurable, this means to measure or calculate the right
costs for the project to be on budget. Attainable, ensuring that opening of this club and all our
activities and plans are achievable. Realistic, Mason PLC project needs to open this new club
and add more features like the salon, swimming pool to attract more customers and increase in
profitability and growth objectives. Lastly Time-bound, Mason PLC project has a time limit of
60 weeks therefore the project has to be within its timeframe when operating its objectives. After
setting goals for our project, we then proceed to the next phase.
2.4.2 Planning Phase
Once the Mason project is approved to move forward , in this phase we break-down larger
projects tasks into smaller tasks, build up teams, prepare schedules, project scope, budgeting,
financial planning, cash flow , work breakdown structure (WBS).
2.4.2.1 Scope Statement
A scope statement process defines the boundaries of a project, subdividing the work into
manageable component with deliverables, verifying that the amount of work planned has been
achieved and specifying scope change control procedures. (Pinto, 2013)
2.4.2.2 Budgeting and Finance planning
The process of determining budget for a project is an activity of aggregating the cost estimates of
individual activities to develop total cost estimates that allows setting a formal cost baseline
according to the project life cycle model in above. This helps in the budget. Financing the
project, this is the monetary resources given to us to undertake the whole project. In the Mason
project we could estimate costs like for example, firstly setting aside the contingency fund of
about £500,000 out of the £2,000,000. The mason project might have costs like, land costs

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estimating £100,000 ,construction of 25 x 12 swimming pool estimated at £20,000, the 100 seat
cinema £30,000, the beauty spa £50,000 workout equipment at fitness facility £40,000.
Operation costs which include labour costs, insurance costs, certification fees and expenses, all
these estimates should be within the given budget for £2,000,000. (APM, 2017)
2.4.2.3 Work breakdown Structure
The (PMBOK Guide, 2018) defines the WBS as a deliverable oriented hierarchical
decomposition of the work to be executed by the project team. This structure helps Mason PLC
organise its tasks and know critical interrelationships among activities. This helps to give
accurate scheduling to know which steps must precede others. (Pinto, 2016) These tasks and
activities of the Mason PLC project include: Design, foundation, construction, roofing, and
landscaping & fencing.
2.4.2.4 Gantt chart
The Gantt chart provides a very easy picture of the Mason PLC project activities and time. This
chart shows time required for each activity , how long each activity takes and when the project
manager schedules each activity so that activities depending on other activities occurring
beforehand are not scheduled until the dependencies have completed like illustrated in the Mason
project Gantt below. (Pinto, 2016)

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Highlighted in red is the project’s critical path (A-B-C-E), which amounts to a total of 60 weeks.

Activity Description Duration Predecessor
A Design of the new club 4 Weeks –
B Laying building foundation 7 Weeks A
C Club Construction 39 Weeks B
D Roofing 3 Weeks C
E Landscaping 10 Weeks C
F Fencing 4 weeks A

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2.4.2.5 Risk management
Risk management is the systematic processes of identifying, analysing and responding to project
risk throughout the project life cycle. (Burke, 2013) In the mason project we need to identify the
possible risk that could affect our project after manage that risk or try to avoid it. The project
plan should be a flexible plan to maintain the project lifecycle successfully and mitigate risks
emerging in the course of the implementation of the project at any stage in the lifecycle. The
identification, assessment and analysis of risks help the project team to elaborate the risk
mitigation plan. The risk mitigation plan, in its turn, helps to decrease the negative impact of
risks on the lifecycle and facilitates the successful accomplishment of the project. There is a
category of possible risks the Mason project could go through, which are financial risks where
we have cash flow problems, budget cuts, government risks, regulations, human error, poor
performance, personality conflicts, lack of communication. (Shan et al., 2017) Risk management
planning is deciding how to approach the plan the risk management activities for a project. In
this case we will use the risk management model.

Figure 2 RISK MANAGEMENT PLAN (Burke, 2013)

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2.4.3 Performing/implementation phase
In the implementation phase this where monitoring and controlling processes take place, this
consists of those processes required to track, review and orchestrate the progress and
performance of a project; identify any areas in which changes to plan are required; and initiate
the corresponding changes. In this case the project manager tracks the performance of the project
how the tasks and activities are going, (PMBOK Guide, 2018) there are several ways a manager
can monitor and control the project, through performing integrated change control, which states
that every project requires changes time to time, the larger the project the more change there
usually is, keeping track of change in light of the timeline budgetary consideration is important
task that must be addressed. This involves verifying the scope, control scope, controlling
schedule, control costs, report performance, performing quality control and monitoring and
controlling risks. (Villanova Univerisity, 2013)
Team Performance
This involves briefing team members on tasks, explaining tasks to team members, providing
necessary guidance on how they should be completed, and organizing process-related training if
necessary. Communicating with the team members, clients and upper management; providing
updates to project stakeholders. (Villanova Univerisity, 2013)
Project Quality Management
This is the processes required to ensure that the project will satisfy the need for which it was
undertaken, it consists of quality planning, this means that the Mason stakeholders must agree up
the quality plan for the project. Quality assurance, this provides confidence to the host
organisation that the mason plc project and programmes and portfolios are being well managed.

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(Diaz ; Antonio, 2018) Lastly we have the quality control and quality improvements; in quality
control this is where a project manager checks and measures the quality of the project and this
quality check can either be qualitative or quantitative. (Richard M.J, 2018)
2.4.4 Termination phase or closing phase
In this phase we provide the final deliverables, release project resources, and determine the
success of the project. (Pinto, 2016) Just because the major project is over that doesn’t mean the
project manager’s job is done. There are a few steps for project closure phase these may include
analyzing project performance, determining if the project’s goal were met (tasks completed on
time and on budget). Analyzing team performance, Documenting project closure, making sure
that all aspects of the project are completed with no loose ends remaining and providing reports
to key stakeholder, conducting post-implementation reviews, this involves conducting the final
analysis for the project , taking into account lessons learnt for similar projects in the future.
Accounting for used and unused budget, which means all the funds and materials remaining in
the Mason projects (havila et al., 2013)

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2.4.5 Conclusion
In conclusion, Mason project is incorporating new facilities and therefore the as a project
manager the skills and competencies deployed will enable the project to finish in time and within
budget. The activities as displayed in the work breakdown structures will enable the project
outcomes to be according to the quality planned so as to meet customers specification.

Task 2 word count: 2296

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3.0 REFERENCES
APM, 2017. Budgeting. Online Available at: https://www.apm.org.uk/body-of-
knowledge/delivery/financial-cost-management/budgeting-and-cost-control/ Accessed 5 APRIL 2018.
Association for Project Management, 2018. Scope Statement process. Online Available at:
https://www.apm.org.uk/body-of-knowledge/delivery/scope-management/ Accessed 30 march 2018.
Benson, J.D., 2013. TEAM MANAGEMENT.
Burke, R., 2013. Project management- planning & control techniques. 5th ed.
Diaz, A. & Antonio, J., 2018. Quality Assurance on Education Spain. Quality Assurance on Education
Spain.
Duffy, J., 2016. PC Magazine. December. pp.133-38.
Ezinne, A., 2013. salem press encyclopedia of science. risk analysis and management.
Field, M. & Keller, L., 1998. In Project Management. Thomson Learning.
Forbes, 2016. Difference between leadership and management. Online Available at:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/williamarruda/2016/11/15/9-differences-between-being-a-leader-and-a-
manager/#6019f22b4609 Accessed 5 april 2018.
Harmon & Angela, 2016. Gantt chart. salem press encyclopedia.
havila, v., medlin, c.j. & salmi, a., 2013. project-ending competence in premature project closures.
project-ending competence in premature project closures, 31(1), pp.90-99.
HEAGNEY, J., 2012. Leadership. In Fundamentals of Project Management. AMACOM.
johann, p., crevani, l. & lindgren, m., 2014. Project leadership in becoming: a process study of
organisation change project. Project management journal.
Maylor, H., 2011. Project Management. 4th ed. financial times / prentice hall M.U.A.
Melton, T., Yates, J. & Iles-Smith, P., 2008. Project Benefits Management. 1st ed. Elsevier Ltd.
packendorff, j., crevani, l. & lindgren, m., 2014. project leadership in becoming a process study of an
organizational change project, 45(3), pp.p5-20.

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Pinto, J.k., 2013. scope statement process. In Project Management, Achieving Competitive Advantage
Global Edition. Pearson Education.
Pinto, J.k., 2016. Project Management, Achieving Competitive Advantage Global edition. Pearson
Education.
PMBOK Guide, 2018. In PMBOK Guide. 6th ed. Project Management Institute.
Project Management for Development Organisations., 2008. Project Quality Management.
Richard M.J, R., 2018. Quality control.
Rowe, S.R., 2015. Project Management for Small Projects. Bernett-Koehler.
Shan, M., hwang, b.-g. & Supa’at, N.N.B., 2017. Green commercial building projects in Singapore:
critical risk factors and mitigation measures.
Slovak journal and civil engineering, 2008. Project Manager and His Competences (knowledge, skill, and
attitude perspectives), pp.P29-36.
The Chartered Body For The Project Profession, 2018. Quality management. Online Available at:
https://www.apm.org.uk/body-of-knowledge/delivery/quality-management/.
The Chartered Body for the Project Profession, 2018. The Core Principles of Project Management.
Online Available at: https://www.apm.org.uk/resources/what-is-project-management/ Accessed 2 april
2018.
Villanova Univerisity, 2013. monitoring and controlling process groups. Online Available at:
https://www.villanovau.com/resources/project-management/pmbok-monitoring-controlling-process-
group/#.Ws8CA0xuLIU Accessed 10 APRIL 2018.

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